2017年08月01日

Nike LeBron 12 Low Performance Review


1.Traction – Nothing has changed in the traction department between the Nike LeBron 12 and the LeBron 12 Low. I guess the one thing that you could consider a change is that there are solid rubber options finally available, whereas the LeBron 12 only offered translucent outsoles to my knowledge. As far as how they played–exactly the same as the original. I personally had no issues with their traction unless there was a considerable amount of dust. They performed really nicely outdoors and indoors and I enjoyed them, just as I had the original 12s.

2.Cushion – The cushion setup has changed and I actually think it’s better in the low than it was in the mid. While the forefoot is missing a Hex Zoom unit, the units are bottom loaded, and you couldn’t really feel them anyway, so you aren’t missing much. While you won’t experience much change in the forefoot, the heel feels awesome. They’ve replaced the large volume Zoom unit with a 180 Air Max unit. Basically, you get maximum cushion in the heel while you receive decent cushion up front that happens to offer greater flexibility and mobility. I don’t think anyone will complain about the cushion setup since it offers a little bit of everything. Pretty well rounded for a LeBron, as far as cushion is concerned, and I loved it.

3.Materials – The regular LeBron 14 for sale used a mesh upper with MegaFuse overlays while the lows feature very little Fuse and a lot of open mesh. Is there a huge difference between the two? Not really. While the mesh uppers haven’t changed too much, the Posite support wings have practically been removed completely and I think that was a huge mistake.

4.Fit – They fit pretty snug, but it’s mesh build so I’d go true to size. They feel great on-foot and require no break in time at all. Containment is solid for the most part – at least in the heel and forefoot – but there is one area where they fail miserably and that’s the midfoot. Remember that Posite that they removed? Yeah…these need that. The Posite material that remains works well for keeping your heel in place – something that is notoriously confused as ankle support – however, the upper portion of the shoe directly above the Posite just can’t contain lateral movements at all. Even with very little weight/ force applied the material gives, and without a HyperRev (original) type strap to keep your foot inside the shoe let’s just say the result can be rolling your ankle within the shoe. This is something I haven’t had happen to me since playing in the dreaded Kobe 7’s.

5.Support – Due to the aforementioned issue at the midfoot, the support suffers greatly. Sure, the outrigger works well, and the Posite – as stated earlier – that’s in place does a fine job at keeping the heel in place, but the upper just can’t handle any type of force applied. Its a pretty big letdown as these cover all the other bases really well. Unfortunately, if you wear these you’re just asking for an ankle injury.

Overall – I can’t remember the last time this has happened – the KD 10 For Sale is the only model that comes to mind at the moment – but everything in the shoe is solid except the lateral support. Traction, cushion, materials, fit (for the most part) is all really nice. If you can’t play in them they’re pretty much worthless on-court. They look great casually, so if that’s all you care about then they’ve got you covered. But if you wanted to play in a pair for kd10sale.com , you’ve been warned.  


Posted by Newtruckspring.com - suspension parts at 17:46Comments(0)Nike LeBron 14

2017年07月05日

The Nike LeBron 14 black ice Performance Review is here


LeBron James have unveiled the latest in the LeBron line, the Nike LeBron 14 Black Ice. Now, HOOP JORDAN gives you our thoughts on the shoe’s on-court performance. The Nike LeBron 14 Performance Review is here .

Traction – For using translucent rubber, the traction on the LeBron 14 wasn’t half bad. Granted, the traction was one of the shoe’s weakest points — but the traction wasn’t horrible. The digi-camo pattern gripped well but there are tiny areas that have been cored out and dust will collect in those areas rather quickly. Keeping them clean is a must if you want to maintain grip on-court.

This rubber compound Nike decided to use is what helped maintain traction in between wiping because it’s fairly soft and a bit tacky. There is some fraying of the rubber in high-wear areas for my foot strikes and movements which reveals a fresh new layer of rubber under it. This is great for always having fresh rubber on-court. Of course, if this fraying were to happen on an adidas model then all hell would break loose — but since this is a Nike shoe we’re going to let it slide completely. Yes, major sarcasm right there.

Fraying of rubber is normal for basketball shoes in today’s era, especially when it comes to translucent rubbers. No, it won’t destroy the rubber on your shoes within a matter of days. That’d be a bit dramatic. However, the pattern itself — coupled with this rubber compound — could have (and should have) been better.

Had the pattern made a bit more sense with its design — like the Nike PG1’s pattern — then these would have been much greater than they were. Again, the traction wasn’t horrible by any means and you’ll receive decent grip out of them. It gets the job done for sure. It just could have been better with perhaps a more simplistic approach.

Cushion – Hex Zoom Air returns, but this time around the units are larger than ever before. The three Hex Zoom units seen above are roughly 14mm thick — that’s a huge Zoom unit. Remember the Melo M13? Yeah, it was awesome. It featured 10mm Zoom units so having 14mm — while not a drastic change — is freaking awesome.

Can you feel the Zoom? Sometimes. Your weight is evenly distributed between each unit, they’re encased in rubber, and they’re bottom loaded, so they don’t compress in the way that you might want them to. However, the protection they provide upon initial impact is great and since the 14mm doesn’t compress much upon foot strikes you’re able to maintain a much quicker response time between movements than you would if you sunk into the cushion. It isn’t a perfect blend of court feel and cushion since you do sit slightly high atop the tooling, but for a larger player it will feel like having a guard shoe on without sacrificing any of the cushion that they may want/need.

The heel Zoom unit is pretty self explanatory. That mofo is HUGE! Same thing applies though. It’s encased in rubber and it’s bottom loaded. It isn’t compressing to the point where you’ll be unstable, just enough to where you can tell your body isn’t taking the brunt of landings.

Side note: I love the flex grooves throughout the outsole. They allow for greater flexibility which is great for someone of my size. I’m far from an NBA-sized athlete and LeBron models have always felt a bit restrictive in terms of fluidity and mobility. They’ve been tweaking this type of setup since the LeBron 12 and this is the best version yet. These truly feel like a guard shoe made for a big man.

Materials – This is where I start to confuse myself when I think too much into it. I like the materials used but I don’t feel that my $175 was justified. Yes, I bought these with my own money, and the shoe is made of foam and mesh overlays. I love the tiny rand of nubuck — some colorways will offer leather — on the toe, but the majority of the shoe is made of materials that I know aren’t costly. Again, I like the materials. I just don’t like having to pay $175 for this type of material. The Zoom Generation Retro retailed for the same price and offered a leather build. This thin foam can’t possibly cost just as much to use.

In terms of actual performance, the foam and mesh build do its job well. It’s flexible and moves well with your foot without feeling overly restrictive. If you played in the Zoom Soldier 10 then it’s the exact same feeling. Some might not enjoy it as it could be too soft/flimsy for them, but I did.

Fit – The LeBron 14 utilizes a one-piece bootie construction comprised of soft/flimsy materials. In order to maintain the best containment while playing in them I’d personally recommend going down 1/2 size. Yes, your toes will be right at the tip of the shoe, but you greatly reduce the risk of dead space. I guarantee you that the last used to shape the one-piece upper isn’t a one-size-fits-all type of last. Every foot shape is different. Going true to size might work out well for wide footers and those with high arches, but for me, going down 1/2 size ensured I received a one-to-one fit.

Lockdown is surprisingly good. The lacing is weird as it relies on Flywire cables to secure your foot for lateral movements, but the strap does a great job containing your midfoot and heel.

Support – There are a couple of traditional support features in place on the LeBron14 but this is one area that definitely could have been better overall. The internal and external heel counters do their job quit well, but the tooling caused some minor instability issues — mostly when stopping or trying to push off at the lateral forefoot. Its a combination of the materials being a little too soft — the fuse area doesn’t completely stop the forefoot from rolling over the footbed — and the tooling itself.

There is an outrigger but it isn’t big enough, and it’s almost rounded. When your foot pushes the materials to the point to where it begins to roll over the footbed then your momentum and added weight to the area will cause you to tip a bit. I tried not to apply too much force to that area but it isn’t always easy to do.

I would have loved it if my foot say within the midsole a bit. This would have stopped my foot from rolling over the footbed since it would be inside the footbed. I think they should have considered carrying over the jagged exaggerated outrigger they used on the LBJ 12 and 13. Those shoes were pretty wide and while they could slow you down a tiny bit, you had much greater stability in the forefoot area. If those two things could not have been accomplished then an independent toecap would have been very useful — as it was in the Zoom Soldier 3. It would have added depth to the design, it would have brought a premium material element as well if they decided to use nubuck and leather, and it would contain the forefoot upon lateral moves without negatively effecting the mobility of the player.

Overall – The Nike KD 10 For Sale isn’t perfect, but no shoe is. Impact protection and overall mobility are two really great features of the shoe. Forefoot stability and overall containment upon lateral moves is something that is hopefully addressed with the Elite model. Traction wasn’t the best, but it wasn’t bad either; it’ll get the job done so long as you keep it clean.

If you’re a small player that wants or needs impact protection while still being able to move freely on-court then these should suit you well. If you’re a big man that needs the same thing then they should be an equally good option. I still can’t wrap my head around the $175 price point for a foam shoe, but that has absolutely nothing to do with the shoe’s performance so I’ll let the buyer be the judge when it comes to value per dollar. http://www.kd10sale.com

I’m reluctant to say this is the best LeBron to-date, but it’s definitely one of the bestto-date.  


Posted by Newtruckspring.com - suspension parts at 18:28Comments(0)Nike LeBron 14

2017年07月05日

The Nike LeBron 14 black ice Performance Review is here


LeBron James have unveiled the latest in the LeBron line, the Nike LeBron 14 Black Ice. Now, HOOPJORDAN gives you our thoughts on the shoe’s on-court performance. The Nike LeBron 14 Performance Review is here .

Traction – For using translucent rubber, the traction on the LeBron 14 wasn’t half bad. Granted, the traction was one of the shoe’s weakest points — but the traction wasn’t horrible. The digi-camo pattern gripped well but there are tiny areas that have been cored out and dust will collect in those areas rather quickly. Keeping them clean is a must if you want to maintain grip on-court.

This rubber compound Nike decided to use is what helped maintain traction in between wiping because it’s fairly soft and a bit tacky. There is some fraying of the rubber in high-wear areas for my foot strikes and movements which reveals a fresh new layer of rubber under it. This is great for always having fresh rubber on-court. Of course, if this fraying were to happen on an adidas model then all hell would break loose — but since this is a Nike shoe we’re going to let it slide completely. Yes, major sarcasm right there.

Fraying of rubber is normal for basketball shoes in today’s era, especially when it comes to translucent rubbers. No, it won’t destroy the rubber on your shoes within a matter of days. That’d be a bit dramatic. However, the pattern itself — coupled with this rubber compound — could have (and should have) been better.

Had the pattern made a bit more sense with its design — like the Nike PG1’s pattern — then these would have been much greater than they were. Again, the traction wasn’t horrible by any means and you’ll receive decent grip out of them. It gets the job done for sure. It just could have been better with perhaps a more simplistic approach.

Cushion – Hex Zoom Air returns, but this time around the units are larger than ever before. The three Hex Zoom units seen above are roughly 14mm thick — that’s a huge Zoom unit. Remember the Melo M13? Yeah, it was awesome. It featured 10mm Zoom units so having 14mm — while not a drastic change — is freaking awesome.

Can you feel the Zoom? Sometimes. Your weight is evenly distributed between each unit, they’re encased in rubber, and they’re bottom loaded, so they don’t compress in the way that you might want them to. However, the protection they provide upon initial impact is great and since the 14mm doesn’t compress much upon foot strikes you’re able to maintain a much quicker response time between movements than you would if you sunk into the cushion. It isn’t a perfect blend of court feel and cushion since you do sit slightly high atop the tooling, but for a larger player it will feel like having a guard shoe on without sacrificing any of the cushion that they may want/need.

The heel Zoom unit is pretty self explanatory. That mofo is HUGE! Same thing applies though. It’s encased in rubber and it’s bottom loaded. It isn’t compressing to the point where you’ll be unstable, just enough to where you can tell your body isn’t taking the brunt of landings.

Side note: I love the flex grooves throughout the outsole. They allow for greater flexibility which is great for someone of my size. I’m far from an NBA-sized athlete and LeBron models have always felt a bit restrictive in terms of fluidity and mobility. They’ve been tweaking this type of setup since the LeBron 12 and this is the best version yet. These truly feel like a guard shoe made for a big man.

Materials – This is where I start to confuse myself when I think too much into it. I like the materials used but I don’t feel that my $175 was justified. Yes, I bought these with my own money, and the shoe is made of foam and mesh overlays. I love the tiny rand of nubuck — some colorways will offer leather — on the toe, but the majority of the shoe is made of materials that I know aren’t costly. Again, I like the materials. I just don’t like having to pay $175 for this type of material. The Zoom Generation Retro retailed for the same price and offered a leather build. This thin foam can’t possibly cost just as much to use.

In terms of actual performance, the foam and mesh build do its job well. It’s flexible and moves well with your foot without feeling overly restrictive. If you played in the Zoom Soldier 10 then it’s the exact same feeling. Some might not enjoy it as it could be too soft/flimsy for them, but I did.

Fit – The LeBron 14 utilizes a one-piece bootie construction comprised of soft/flimsy materials. In order to maintain the best containment while playing in them I’d personally recommend going down 1/2 size. Yes, your toes will be right at the tip of the shoe, but you greatly reduce the risk of dead space. I guarantee you that the last used to shape the one-piece upper isn’t a one-size-fits-all type of last. Every foot shape is different. Going true to size might work out well for wide footers and those with high arches, but for me, going down 1/2 size ensured I received a one-to-one fit.

Lockdown is surprisingly good. The lacing is weird as it relies on Flywire cables to secure your foot for lateral movements, but the strap does a great job containing your midfoot and heel.

Support – There are a couple of traditional support features in place on the LeBron14 but this is one area that definitely could have been better overall. The internal and external heel counters do their job quit well, but the tooling caused some minor instability issues — mostly when stopping or trying to push off at the lateral forefoot. Its a combination of the materials being a little too soft — the fuse area doesn’t completely stop the forefoot from rolling over the footbed — and the tooling itself.

There is an outrigger but it isn’t big enough, and it’s almost rounded. When your foot pushes the materials to the point to where it begins to roll over the footbed then your momentum and added weight to the area will cause you to tip a bit. I tried not to apply too much force to that area but it isn’t always easy to do.

I would have loved it if my foot say within the midsole a bit. This would have stopped my foot from rolling over the footbed since it would be inside the footbed. I think they should have considered carrying over the jagged exaggerated outrigger they used on the LBJ 12 and 13. Those shoes were pretty wide and while they could slow you down a tiny bit, you had much greater stability in the forefoot area. If those two things could not have been accomplished then an independent toecap would have been very useful — as it was in the Zoom Soldier 3. It would have added depth to the design, it would have brought a premium material element as well if they decided to use nubuck and leather, and it would contain the forefoot upon lateral moves without negatively effecting the mobility of the player.

Overall – The Nike KD 10 For Sale isn’t perfect, but no shoe is. Impact protection and overall mobility are two really great features of the shoe. Forefoot stability and overall containment upon lateral moves is something that is hopefully addressed with the Elite model. Traction wasn’t the best, but it wasn’t bad either; it’ll get the job done so long as you keep it clean.

If you’re a small player that wants or needs impact protection while still being able to move freely on-court then these should suit you well. If you’re a big man that needs the same thing then they should be an equally good option. I still can’t wrap my head around the $175 price point for a foam shoe, but that has absolutely nothing to do with the shoe’s performance so I’ll let the buyer be the judge when it comes to value per dollar. http://www.kd10sale.com

I’m reluctant to say this is the best LeBron to-date, but it’s definitely one of the bestto-date.  


Posted by Newtruckspring.com - suspension parts at 16:55Comments(0)Nike LeBron 14

2017年06月22日

You can find the Nike LeBron Soldier 11 now at kd10sale.com

The Nike LeBron Soldier 11 performance review is here. How do they stack up to last year’s Soldier 10? Only one way to find out.


You can find the Nike LeBron Soldier 11 now at kd10sale.com


Nike LeBron Soldier 11 Performance Review traction


Traction – One of the easiest things to get right on a shoe, yet so many seem to get it wrong. While the traction on the Nike LeBron Soldier 11 isn’t bad, it isn’t as good as it should be. It was only bad in one single spot under the ball of the foot. For whatever reason, when I’d plant in that section while changing direction or curling around a screen I’d slip a bit, causing a delay in my movement, which in turn caused me to second guess even making the same move again.




Initially, I thought it was just that I was too light on my feet, but then I witnessed LeBron slip in the same exact manner I would while he made a move in the Finals. It isn’t a complete slip, it’s more like a very small slip. However, its enough to make you go “whoa, that was a close one” while it happens to you during gameplay.


Will playing in a solid rubber-soled version of the Zoom change the performance? I’m not sure. Surprisingly enough, the translucent outsole on the Soldier 11 performed well overall. It was just that single spot on the outsole that wasn’t that great. This might be a case where the pattern has failed in that area rather than blaming it solely on the rubber compound this time around.


Nike LeBron Soldier 11 Performance Review cushion


Cushion – This is the same cushion setup as last years Soldier 10 but the Zoom Air units are implemented much better this time around. The Phylon is still really lightweight and fairly unforgiving, as it was on the Soldier 10, but the Zoom units protrude from the outsole a bit which makes them feel more lively underfoot. You won’t feel a super bouncy sensation but you’ll feel the units compress a bit more than last season’s model.


You can also see from the image above (courtesy of FastPass) that the Zoom Air isn’t packed into place this year; there is some space between the foam carrier and the Zoom bags themselves. This allows them to compress and move a bit more, furthering the traditional Zoom Air feeling that most shoes lack today.


Size wise, the Zoom Air units are pretty damn big (8mm thick in the forefoot and 14mm thick in the heel) which means impact protection is solid overall. In terms of player type, this setup is versatile enough for every player. There is enough court feel for smaller quicker players and plenty of impact protection for larger players. As a smaller guy myself, this year’s Soldier 11 was much more enjoyable from a cushion standpoint than the Soldier 10.




Materials – There are two versions of the Nike LeBron Soldier 11, each coming in at a different price point. If you wanted to keep the price as reasonable as possible then this $130 version of the shoe will do the trick. It features a one-piece mesh build with a ballistic nylon mudguard. This offers the feeling of wearing a knit/woven upper but with a bit more strength.


The premium version of the Soldier 11 replaces the ballistic nylon with a more luxurious nubuck mudguard. This gives a similar feel but adds a little more weight to the equation. However, it’s a great blend of new and old. Leathers and nubucks are used less and less as time goes on so its nice to see a shoe successfully integrate this type of material while keeping the overall build modern. Unfortunately, this premium offering will cost you $10 more because that build retails for $140. Sales and markdowns are a staple in today’s market, thankfully, so if you’re patient enough then you’ll be able to grab the premium version (if that is the one you’d prefer) for less than retail soon enough.


Both options are durable so I wouldn’t let that be a factor in your decision making. The main difference between the two options, other than their price, will be weight. Nylon is the lighter of the two. Personally, weight isn’t a huge issue so either one would work just fine.


Cheap Nike LeBron Soldier 11 Performance Review fit


Fit – The LeBron Soldier 11 fits true to size. Yes, the one piece build is back, and the shoes are a little hard to get on, but they’re not as difficult as the Soldier 10 — and they fit a bit more securely. Removing the three large straps and replacing them with four smaller straps allows you to isolate each section of the shoe a bit better so you can tighten the upper up where you need. I needed to tighten them up mostly in the forefoot area as they have a bit of volume above the toe. The forefoot strap helped lock down my foot so I was happy it was there, and once the materials are broke in a bit things started to feel secure.


Wide footers, you’ll want to try the shoe on before buying. Unfortunately, one piece builds are not exactly a one size fits all type of thing.


Lockdown on the shoe was good. Better than the Soldier 10 good? Yes. I never ran into issues with the Soldier 10s upper containment, but as stated above, the isolation of each section of the upper from the four straps really worked better than last year’s version.


Nike LeBron Soldier 11 Performance Review support


Support – Another area that has been slightly modified and improved upon since the Soldier 10 is the support. The platform on which the Soldier 11 sits is much nicer because it’s wider than the last model — something that was definitely needed because those protruding Zoom units feel a little wobbly underfoot when you first take them for a spin.


Something I found interesting is that the shoe offers the traditional forefoot outrigger in addition to a midfoot outrigger. With the outsole shaped similarly to an actual foot, coupled with wobbly Zoom units underneath, this additional outrigger helped keep me stable while in motion. Additionally, the midsole sculpt of the Soldier 11 is much better than that of the Soldier 10. The heel and forefoot areas wrap up onto the foot ensuring you remain on top of the footbed; this also diminishes the risk of your foot rolling over the footbed. I wish this was implemented much more than it is in performance basketball footwear.


Basic support features are in place as well. A torsional V-plate at the midfoot is embedded within the midsole at the midfoot and there is a rubber external heel counter for added support at the heel.


Is the shoe’s fit supportive enough without laces being involved? Yes, at least for me. Heavier players might require a bit more for this area but LeBron is a pretty big guy and the straps and overall fit seemed to work for him nicely.


Nike LeBron Soldier 11 Performance Review overall


Overall – The Nike LeBron Soldier 11 is a much better shoe than the Soldier 10, overall. While traction could still use a little bit of work, the cushion is immensely better than the last go-around. Suitable for every position on the floor, the LeBron Soldier line has shifted from LBJ’s playoff model of choice to LBJ’s version of the Hyperdunk within his own line of branded footwear. http://www.kd10sale.com


It’s remarkable that designers were able to create a shoe supportive enough for LeBron yet have it weigh just 13 ounces. That is lighter than most current guard shoes — and lighter than last year’s Soldier 10, while improving upon the fit and support. If the hiccup in the traction is improved with solid rubber versions of the model then I can see these being a great option for players than want a little bit of everything with their on-court shoes. Although, this would probably be a non-issue had Nike just gone simple and used herringbone.


If you were considering grabbing a pair of the Nike LeBron Soldier 11 for your upcoming season or rec league, I hope this performance review helps. We appreciate you tuning in.

  


Posted by Newtruckspring.com - suspension parts at 18:12Comments(0)Nike LeBron 14

2017年03月30日

Nike Lebron 14 HARDWOOD CLASSICS PE Debuts at


Last night, the Cleveland Cavaliers faced the Chicago Bulls in a Hardwood Classics-themed match, as LeBron James flaunted the yet-to-release Nike LeBron 14, coordinated in the respective “HWC” colorway that correlates with the Cavs’ 80s era throwback uniforms.

Noted as a player exclusive, the new performance basketball silhouette is simply draped in vibrant orange, while royal blue accents and gradient-effect detailing is evidenced across its midsole unit. Finally, an icy translucent outsole unit finishes off the versatile profile altogether.

This Nike LeBron 14 HARDWOOD CLASSICS features a full Orange-based upper with Blue contrasting accents and branding throughout. A gradient midsole and icy translucent outsole completes the design.

It’s still unclear if this model will be offered to the public, but be sure to stay tuned to Hoopjordan for further updates.  


Posted by Newtruckspring.com - suspension parts at 17:05Comments(0)Nike LeBron 14