2018年02月22日

Under Armour Heat Seeker Performance Review


The more things stay the same, the more they change. Wait, that isn’t right. The Under Armour Heat Seeker keeps some things from the past while completely re-doing others. What stayed, what didn’t, and how does it all come together? Let’s do this…

Speaking of staying the same, the Heat Seeker uses the exact same midsole and outsole as the Drive 4. Not a bad idea when it comes to the traction, as this is some of the best herringbone on the market. The blades are thick and widely spaced, which means plenty of surface area to grab and plenty of space to push dust out of the way.

The soles were squeaky and loud and stopped on a dime in any direction with no hesitation.There was no sliding on any of the three indoor courts I played on — whether dust was present or not. The flex grooves under the ball of the foot are still there and lead to an awesome transition feel, keeping the forefoot from becoming too stiff and rigid.

Durability? It’s weird — on the Curry 4, playing outdoors was no issue. The herringbone is good for multiple wears on smooth or rough surfaces and the grooves are deep for longevity. However, the Heat Seeker showed signs of fraying on the edges of the forefoot and heel from just indoor use after four days of playing. Nothing major, just some slight wearing, and the actual herringbone was still intact. It’s something to keep an eye on.

Again, some things stay the same. No, that isn’t HOVR — be patient — but an EVA foam carrier and forefoot with Micro G in the heel puck. Not a bad setup, but when HOVR is on the market in the running line, it makes it hard to accept the EVA forefoot found here.

On the plus side, the ride is low and the midsole responds to every move you throw at it. Impact absorption coming down from jumpers is good, but has a dead feeling — there’s no bounce-back at all. Again, for playing on your toes and quick movements, the foam never has a sinking feeling to slow you down.

The Micro G in the heel is what we all used to love — soft but responsive, stable, low-riding, and very protective. I have no idea why Micro G is only in the heel, but since we have it there, just enjoy it. The EVA is stable on landings, letting the Micro G bounce back to provide serious pain relief for your joints.

We have change and it is good. This is not Under Armour’s first trip into a knitted upper for basketball (we got the Charged Controller and the Curry 3 that used Threadborne in 2017). However, this is the first shoe that feels like a knitted upper.

The Heat Seeker features an engineered knit upper (no signs of the name Threadborne) with an extended ankle collar. The knit itself is stretchy where it needs to be — over the top of the foot in the lace area, around the ankle — and not stretchy at all on high-stress areas like the lateral forefoot. The containment is serious, which was a huge relief, as some knits don’t hold shape under extreme force. The Heat Seeker is easily one of the most comfortable shoes Under Armour Basketball has ever put out.

Inside that knit upper is a 3/4 length inner sleeve that helps provide the containment. Here is the trick: the laces go through the knitted upper and lace through the sleeve, which has lace straps internally, sewn into the midsole. The sleeve is neoprene, so it will stretch for easy entry, but this also means it wraps your foot and holds you tight.

There is a little bit of fuse over the big toe, but this is nothing that affects feel or flex – it just keeps the knit from wearing on toe drags and gives a little protection if you get stepped on. Plus it adds a nice color hit to break up that forefoot.

Being a knitted upper, fit should be spot on, and it is. There is almost no dead space anywhere in the upper, except for a little extra length in the toebox (I like about a thumb’s width between my toe and the end of the shoe, and these were right on it). If you like to have no space at all at the end of the shoe, you could go a half size down, but true to size worked great. The last feels narrower than the KD 10, more like the Curry 4, so wide footers my need to try these on first.

While the lacing runs through the sleeve and the knit does form-fit, the laces actually don’t add much until the ankle collar. They are hard to tighten, but you really shouldn’t need to do so. The heel is locked in using extra padding, almost like a dog bone, around the area that forms over your foot and takes up most of the empty space. Meanwhile, the lacing system in the ankle runs high enough that any heel slip is stopped when laced tight (again, the one area where the laces can be pulled tight).

There are three reasons the Heat Seeker, a shoe with a knitted upper, feels very supportive: a wide, solid base; a solid midfoot shank; and a fairly solid heel counter.

The midsole sticks out on all sides from the upper, meaning you are coming down stable and solid. Narrow base = tipping. Wide base = stable. From a birds-eye view of the forefoot, you can see the midsole sticking out. When coming around picks or cuts, that solid base will let you plant with no issues and rise up for a shot or push off into your steps with no delay. Better stability means less lag time, which makes you quicker.

The Heat Seeker features the same midfoot shank as the Drive 4 and while it isn’t huge, it is solid and placed perfectly. It stops before the forefoot so there is no added stiffness in that area but under the midfoot you are held up and safe.

The heel counter, at first appearance, seems flimsy and soft. It is, at least on the sides of the heel. The rear is solid, however, and works with the top laces to hold your foot into the rear of the shoe, keeping your foot upright and stable but still allowing the flexibility of the knit to shine.

The Under Armour Heat Seeker is close — thisclose — to being great. It needs HOVR, and we all know it. Under Armour will probably continue to hear “we need HOVR” until it appears on a ball shoe. The one thing missing was great cushioning, but even so, the Heat Seeker is still extremely good.

Great traction, fit was spot on, and support, for a knitted mid-top, was serious. If you are a high-flying, quick guard or play that 3-and-D game, the Heat Seeker will work wonders. Actually, anyone up to extreme big men/post players should be good, and even then, with the solid midsole and support, the shoe may still work on 2018jordans.com

In case you missed it, Dennis Smith Jr. just did arguably the greatest 360 dunk in history in the Heat Seeker. Knowing what DSJ could bring, Under Armour knew it had to bring the, well, heat. Mission accomplished.  


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2018年02月14日

Under Armour Curry 1 Low Performance Reviews


After straight killing the Curry 1, Under Armour could have sat back and waited on the Curry 4 to give us more of what we crave. But like all great signature shoes, a low top was needed, and a low is what we got. Can it hold up to the mid? Or is it an unneeded addition to a new line? You know how we do…

First up, I have to give credit, AGAIN, to Under Armour, for having the foresight to sign an athlete of Steph’s character. Coming off ankle injuries and missed games, it was a gamble to go big with him as your headliner, but I would say so far the gamble has paid well. Steph also took a HUGE gamble, going from King Swoosh to UA, but he has known what we at 2018jordans.com have known for a while – Nike makes great performers, but so do other brands. Give them a shot. Anyway, enough wallowing, let’s roll…

MATERIALS – As we saw in  MOST of the mid colorways, we get Anafoam in the upper. I won’t get too deep, because the review of the mids covers most of the facts covers most of the facts, but Anafoam is a foam backed mesh that forms to your foot as it gets heated. Not saran wrap, but gets comfy. Charged foam in the midsole for cushioning and some fuse touches around high stress areas. Same as the mids.

FIT – Welcome to our first area of change. But change is good. My only other pair of Curry’s are the Dark Matter version, and while they did fit TTS, I will say there was a little dead space in the forefoot. I had heard the MVP’s had changed the fit and were closer to 1:1 than previous versions, but we all know how that release went down. I could tell, on first lace up, that the Low’s fit snugger in the forefoot and midfoot, and the toe box was shallower, really giving the wearer a secure lockdown. I have read some going half size up – I wouldn’t. Length is perfect, and when I tried on a half up the toe flexed in a weird way, popping as it bent. TTS broke in around an hour after wearing them casually and since then no problems. Midfoot is dead on, with the shank plate providing just enough arch support to let you know it’s there without being painful. Heel fit is a problem for playing if you don’t lace tight,  as most low tops are. But just give a little pull and the heel cup locks you in. I still experienced a slight slipping but nothing that made me think I was going to lose a shoe or roll an ankle.

CUSHIONING – The second change in the shoe. You still get Charged Foam, and it is still a little dead feeling compared to Micro G, but instead of the orange Micro G insole, we are given an OrthoLite open-cell insole. On step-in comfort, the Ortho is great, but it will break down quicker than the Micro G. Also, especially in the forefoot, there was a more pronounced bounceback when playing. Whether the formula for the Charged was changed or there was more of it, I don’t know. All I know is, compared to the mids, the lows felt springy and responsive. Heel impact was the same as the mids, with no pain at ALL from off landings or heel slaps.

TRACTION – Same as the mids. And the Clutchfit Drive.




Support/Stability – For a low, VERY stable. The heel cup/counter comes up just high enough to keep you locked in but still allows the range of motion for a low. The cup runs down in to the midfoot tying the support in and taking away any slappy feeling that Under Armour used to be known for in hoops shoes (Black Ice and Bloodline especially). This is the closest to a running shoe UA has put out for basketball, something I love. Also, the wide base in the heel helps keep your ankle upright and the general density of the Charged foam doesn’t compress easily so the threat rolling over is lessened. The forefoot had a large outrigger, but it is set back to under the midfoot up to the pinky toe, not past. Some brands place the outrigger farther forward, making toe-off drag and affecting reaction. By placing it where the Curry does it doesn’t affect the foot flex and really only comes into play when needed. Under the arch, we go back to the large arch support – a TPU bridge that gives the right amount of support without pushing your foot too far up or forward, which lead to foot cramping and fatigue.




OVERALL – A great addition to the young Curry line. If you liked the mids, you will like the lows. If you like the Kobe ad  or IX, you will love the Curry. If you like great cushioning, fit, good traction and transition, you will love the Curry Low. It’s really simple – if you like a great performing low top basketball shoe, you will love the Curry Low. They are EXTREMELY hard to get right now, selling out across the companies like some guy from Chicago played in them. Think about that – two years ago, an Under Armour shoe selling out was ridiculous. Now, you can’t find even the worst colorways of the Curry on shelves. We hear you, Basketball Shoes. No more hiding the goods.  


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2018年02月13日

Jordan Melo M13 Performance Review


Thirteen?!?! Hard to believe Melo has been in the league as long as he has, but yes, here it is, his thirteenth signature from Jordan Brand. The Melo line was long thought of as the “luxury” sig, right below the Jordan model as far as materials and technology. How will the Jordan Melo M13 compare to the rest of the line? You know how we do…

How do I say this? Oh, I know: not good. To start with, the pattern only has lines that run across, and nothing breaking up the pattern to give the shoe something to hold on to when playing laterally. These work decent on a really clean court, but for the normal courts most of you will play on, not so much.

Then JB added moguls to the Melo M13 sole pattern. Yeah, moguls — like on a snowy mountain and you ski down them. These are supposed to give the sole more of a cleated feel, to compress and give texture to the flat sole, and really, they don’t. The nubs end up compressing completely and then you get a flat sole with only horizontal parallel lines for traction. Again, if you play on NBA, college, or even well-kept high school courts you should be good. For the rest of us who play where we see a hoop, well, good luck — the next Winter Olympics is looking for skaters.

Outdoors, I don’t even know. The grooves are shallow and the rubber is not extremely hard or durable, so I wouldn’t recommend using the Melo M13 outdoors for very long.

Jordan hit a massive home run with Unlocked Zoom in the XX8 and has since modified and evolved from there with some good iterations and some bad. The Melo M13 uses the Flight Speed system and Unlocked Zoom from the Jordan XX9, which rides lower and more stable than the original example. The forefoot is well cushioned and responsive with the Zoom pushing your foot back on compression. The nubs on the bottom give a weird sensation when added to the mix, adding even more compression under the ball of the foot for a more forgiving ride. Honestly, this is the XX9 forefoot because it feels exactly the same; it rides low with great impact protection and springs back to place quickly.

Jordan Brand decided with the Jordan 32 that heel Air was not needed, so we were introduced to a cored-out section of foam in the heel of most of its shoes that year including the Super.Fly 2 and the Melo M11. Nothing has changed, as the M13 stays with the concept. Still a Phylon base, the heel area didn’t have any problems absorbing impact or taking force and was extremely stable on post-ups and hard plants. Foam done right does the job, as we have learned these past couple of years, and this Phylon is very close to correct. Cushioning is not the issue with the Melo M13.

The Melo M13 uses a mesh upper with Kurim overlays around the lateral side and heel, and the mesh feels great on-foot. Soft and flexible, there are no hot spots at all and the upper forms right around your foot when laced. The mesh isn’t as soft as the KD 10 heel or the Hyperdunk 2016, but for the focus of the Melo line, this version is better because it provide a little more structure. Of course, there is the fuse area over the toecap (for drag) and along the seams (for strength).

Not sure what the Kurim is for, other than design. The individual pieces aren’t connected in any way, so besides looks, the only thing it could possibly be for is to protect the mesh from side swipes. The tongue is regular open cell mesh for some breathability. A little leather stripe placed along the heel for Melo’s signature is actually a nice touch — JB should have just made the heel wrap completely out of that leather.

The fit of the Jordan Melo M13 Ice Blue is nothing special, which is perfect. There are five fit straps through the forefoot and midfoot and two regular lace holes on the ankle, along with an internal bootie/tongue system. Altogether, these allow the shoe to be laced however tight or loose you need (for me, extra tight). Once laced solid, there is no heel slip or midfoot movement to really complain about, at least before playing (more on that next).

Sizing is dead on; a size 10.5 fits just like a 10.5 should, about a thumb width in the length from the end of my big toe. There is very little dead space over the toes in the toebox, so some wiggle room is there but not enough to move the wife and kids in. Even without the ankle pillows from the M12, the heel is locked when laced tight — no pulling your foot out without loosening the laces in the Melo M13.

And here is another problem with the Melo M13. First, the heel counter. Do you see it? Can you find it? Me either, because there isn’t one. That can be a problem, especially if you like a little extra help on bad landings or post up moves. Maybe Melo liked that omission, I don’t know, but I don’t.

However, the midfoot is supported by the Flight Speed system and it does a great job, like always. The plate keeps the midfoot straight and solid while making the transition smooth and fluid.

Now for forefoot containment. Again, there is none. Maybe not none, but the foot sits right on top of the midsole, so no sidewall help. The mesh is soft with no overlays, so no upper help. The lacing straps are just nylon ties going into the footbed — a little help but not enough. My foot, when it wasn’t sliding from lack of traction, was all over the place inside the shoe while cutting and stopping. The first two things I need are traction and stability/support/containment, and the Melo was far behind in both, at least for my game.

Nice try, but not quite. Felled by traction and support, the Melo M13 had potential. Cushioning was nice, even without heel Zoom. The materials were good, and aesthetically, I think it is one of the best Melo’s ever. That traction, though. Can’t do it. I hate, hate the feeling I get when I come off a screen and plant for a jumper and my lead foot keeps going. After that, it’s a guess whether the shoe will stop or not, and when it does, the upper can’t handle the torque, letting my foot roll over the footbed completely on some occasions.

If you are a stationary player, shooting endless 25 foot threes, or a real post that plants in the block for a 10 count, then the Melo M13 may be for you. If you are a dynamic player looking for movement and containment on hard cuts, nope, nada. The search continues for you. Much like Melo’s game, it seems  


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2018年02月12日

Nike Announces Kobe 1 Retro X Undefeated and Lebron X Kith


Nike has unveiled its Makers of the Game collection for All-Star and it is comprised of tons of releases. Two stood out: the Zoom Kobe 1 Protro x Undefeated and the second part of the LeBron 15 Kith collection.

Beginning February 15, these releases will begin dropping on 2018jordans.com and Nike SNKRS to celebrate the 2018 All-Star Game.

First, Nike and Kobe Bryant have partnered with historic LA boutique Undefeated. The team there reimagined the Zoom Kobe 1 Protro for the City of Angels. Expect this camo rendition of Kobe’s updated signature on February 15 for $175.

Second, Kith’s Ronnie Fieg is back with the second installment of his LeBron x Kith Long Live the King collection. This part of the collection will feature four footwear styles: a stunning white Nike LeBron 15 Lifestyle, a black and gold LeBron 15 Lifestyle, a white and floral LeBron 15 Performance, and a blacked out LeBron 15 Performance. Expect elevated pricing similar to the first part of the Kith collection. Matching apparel will flank the footwear pieces.

“Chapter 2 of Long Live the King was originally supposed to be our first release with Nike and LeBron,” Fieg wrote on Instagram. “But after seeing how incredible the product turned out I wanted to save it for the most impactful notch in our brand’s timeline yet. That moment is finally here after years in the making, and I can’t wait to share it with the world. Chapter 2 is a story of royalty, and is divided into 4 main palettes: City of Angels, King’s Cloak, King’s Crown, and Suit of Armor. The Chapter 2 Journal is now live via link in bio. P.S. I see you with that buzzer beater last night @kingjames hell of a way to kick off these next few days. Chapter 2.”

Sound off in the comments on which of one of these collaborative releases you’re most excited for.  


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2018年02月09日

Today Take a Look at Nike's All Star 2018 Sneakers


2018 NBA ALL Star y is right around the corner and Nike has something special for the ladies and men's next week.

Three classic models from the Swoosh, the Nike KD 10 and Nike LeBron 15 and Nike Kyrie 4 All Star, get some love for the day of love.

Three pairs feature completely white, leather bases, and the pairs are decked out with special pieces at the base of the laces; the right shoes on both pairs sport a detail of three hearts, with the middle in red and the two surrounding hearts in white.

This Nike KD 10  ‘All-Star’ features an Ocean Fog, Fuchsia Blast and Hyper Crimson color combination. Utilizing a multicolor knitted upper while Fuchsia lands on the Nike Swoosh logos on the side. In addition new have a graphic of Santa Monica on the insoles while a marble pattern outsole completes the look.

This Nike LeBron 15 ‘All-Star’ comes dressed in a Rust Pink, Metallic Gold and Black color combination. Utilizing Light Pink Flyknit across the base, Black lands on the laces, heel and speckled on the midsole. Following we have Metallic Gold on the branding located at the heel and midsole. They are also expected to feature a LA graphic on the insoles.

The Nike Kyrie 4 ‘All-Star’ One of the more eventful Nike Kyrie 4 releases, this pair comes dressed in Black and White while using a tie dye pattern. In addition we have Purple on the Nike Swoosh, Pink on the tongue branding and Blue across the outsole. Paying tribute to Los Angeles, the insoles have a graphic of Venice Beach. Finishing the look is ‘5x All-Star’ paying tribute to Kyrie.

Three the Nike kd 10 and Nike LeBron 15 and Nike Kyrie 4  ‘All Star’ will release February 15th, 2018 overseas in women’s sizing on 2018jordans.com  


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2018年02月08日

Air Jordan 1 Banned VS Chicago,Which is better?


As two kinds of popular sneakers of Air  Jordan, Air Jordan 1 Banned and the Air Jordan 1 Chicago , which is better ?

So let us look the details as below :

Jordan Brand unveils this insane Air Jordan 1 Retro High OG “Homage To Home” Sample that combines the famed “Banned” and “Chicago” colorways into one cohesive sneaker. The shoes are split down the tongue, with the “Banned” color owning the lateral side and the “Chicago” on the medial. This may remind you of the Air Jordan 1 “Quai 54” Friends and Family that was revealed during the big event in Paris.

jordan Brand is bringing the correct heat to the green with the release of the Air Jordan 1 Retro High Golf Shoe. We first saw a similar sample leaked by MJ’s son Marcus, but with official images now live, it appears that a release is near – potentially closer to late Spring. This familiar “Chicago” colorway has some differences from the basketball original, like the “Nike” Wings logo, the larger Jumpman on the tongue, and of course, the new outsole fit for the green.

With the Retro prices at an all-time high, consumers have stopped consuming most Retro releases on Saturday in hopes that they grab a grail, or strike it big with a Retro that will fetch them a high resell profit. That shoe looks to be the ‘Banned’ Air Jordan 1, even though Jordan Brand has proven that it will release the shoe every 3 or so years.

However ,   Air Jordan 1 Chicago also  become the most popular  shoes since it released .To the uninitiated, they may look like the same shoe. Ask the average sneakerhead, and they'll tell you the difference is the midsole — the 1.5 "The Return" swaps the original rubber tooling for the Air Jordan 2's polyurethane setup. But take a closer look and you'll find that that's only the beginning.

So which one will  you choose ?  


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2018年02月07日

Today Take a Look at Nike's Valentine's Day Sneakers


Valentine’s Day is right around the corner and Nike has something special for the ladies next week.

Three classic models from the Swoosh, the Nike Air Force 1 Low Valentine’s Day and Nike Blazer Low and Air Jordan 7 GS, get some love for the day of love.

Three pairs feature completely white, leather bases, and the pairs are decked out with special pieces at the base of the laces; the right shoes on both pairs sport a detail of three hearts, with the middle in red and the two surrounding hearts in white.

On the heel of Three pairs are halves of a broken heart, which can only be put together when side by side with its respective pair. Pinstripes makes their way onto the tongue, inner lining, and the broken hearts on the heels of each pair.

The Valentines Day Air Jordan 7 GS utilizes a dark grey upper with white landing on sections of the midsole and branding. Black then lands on the tongue, laces and basketball shaped as a heart. What makes them stand out more is the use of fuchsia hitting up some of the midsole and stitching.

Three the Nike Air Force 1 Low and Nike Blazer Low and Air Jordan 7 GS ‘Valentine’s Day’ will release February 10 overseas in women’s sizing on 2018jordans.com  


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2018年02月06日

This Day Talk About Nike Air Force 1 Reviews and history


To this day, the only pair of shoes that I’ve ever cleaned at least once a week is the Nike Air Force 1. Although it’s been a while since I copped a fresh set of these kicks, there really is nothing quite like the feeling you get from sliding your feet into a brand new all-white pair of the AF1. Well, until they get dirty at least.

It was in 1982 that Nike designer Bruce Kilgore dialed up his creative mojo and developed one of the most iconic products in the history of fashion itself. It’s world renowned fame is so focused off the court that its origins as a high performance basketball shoe is hardly known by the vast population who wear them daily. It was after all the first basketball shoe to have a bag of air inserted into the heel for on-court cushion and support, which has obviously become of Nike’s staple concepts with Zoom Air and Air Max technologies having followed since. If you didn’t already know, aren’t you a bit surprised?

Legendary poster of the first six.
Having basketball roots, these kicks were definitely represented well through six old school players in Moses Malone, Michael Cooper, Jamaal Wilkes, Mychal Thompson, Bobby Jones, and Calvin Natt as they were selected to embody the six original symbolisms of the shoes (heroic/consistent/dominant/courageous/constant/pure). To commemorate 25 years of excellence for the AF1 in 2007, Nike revived and expanded this concept by creating “The Second Coming” campaign that featured the NBA’s top dogs (at the time) in Shawn Marion, Rasheed Wallace, Steve Nash, Amare Stoudemire, LeBron James, Kobe Bryant, Chris Paul, Paul Pierce, Jermaine O’Neal, and Tony Parker to endorse the Air Force XXV, a shoe that was made to pay homage to the original AF1.

Okay, now, let’s get to the shoe itself. The Air Force 1 generally features a leather upper with a full rubber outsole. Right above the midsole, we see single-line stitching, which also rests above the “AIR” logo on the heel end. The Swoosh logo is on both the medial and lateral sides of the shoe which itself, is constructed of multiple panels that are all stitched together. With well over 1,700 different models in nearly 30 years of existence, the AF1 has seen more than its fair share of colorways and material combinations with certain specialty pairs even going for as much as $2000.

Circa 2007.
Bottom line, the Nike Air Force 1 isn’t so much about the quality, which is exceptional with high quality comfort and cushioning, as it is about cultural style and substance. While there are low-top, mid-top, and high-top versions, I am personally a fan of the lows because like I said in the beginning, there’s just something about a new clean pair of all-white AF1’s that always devour my senses. These nike kd 10 blinders  are undoubtedly an all-time classic that boys and girls from all over the world have rocked at school, church, on the street, or at the park – and that includes you.

Even so, it’s been a few years since I’ve bought myself a new pair due to the maintenance factor because frankly, I don’t have much time to spare towards cleaning my shoes. I must say though, talking about them is kind of making me want a new pair so “I can get to stompin’ in my Air Force Ones” ala Nelly.

And just in case you’re wondering how insanely cemented these kicks are into the fabric of our globe’s street wear culture, the Clot x nike air force 1 premium white rake in an estimated $800 mil a year in the U.S. alone. Yes, they’re that special.

Scope the commercial for “The Second Coming” that features some of the NBA’s top superstars as they engage in a little “friendly competition”.  


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2018年02月05日

Better Air Jordan 3: “We The Best” Or “Black Cement”


Jordan Brand brings back the iconic Air Jordan 3 Black Cement to celebrate the model’s 30th Anniversary, which will also included Nike Air heels. For the occasion, we put them up against DJ Khaled’s highly demanded Air Jordan 3 We The Best rendition.


Designed by DJ Khaled himself and his closest friends. This Air Jordan 3 comes dressed in a Red leather upper with elephant print overlays completed with “We The Best” on the heels.

The Air Jordan 3 Red  by DJ Khaled is highlighted with Red tumbled leather throughout the uppers while the traditional perforations land on the tongue. Following we have elephant print which wraps the toe and heel. The Jumpman branding is done in White while Black accents are seen on the midsole and bottom eyelets. On the heel we have ‘WE THE BEST’ while on the inside of the heel tab reads #GREATFUL, #WeTheBest, and #stillinthemeeting.

the Air Jordan 3 “Black Cement” released was back in 2011, which didn’t included Nike Air branding. This 2018 Retro marks the first time it will be retroed with its original branding since 2001.

Dressed in a Black, Cement Grey, White and Fire Red color scheme. This Air Jordan 3 comes complete with classic Nike Air branding at the heel and outsole, along with Fire Red tongue lining, a signature seen on the colorway to complete the legendary look for the “Black Cement” 3s. The Air Jordan 3 Black Cement is officially set to release on Michael Jordan’s birthday, February 17th during NBA All-Star Weekend.

Even though DJ Khaled’s Air Jordan 3 never released to the public, if you had an opportunity to purchase either pair, which would it be?
  


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2018年02月03日

Under Armour HOVR Phantom Performance Review


This has been a very difficult review, not because of the HOVR Phantom, but because of the release date.

We at hoopjordan.com have had this shoe since November so we have put some miles on it, and it has been difficult holding back our thoughts from all of you. That said, the day is here, and the Under Armour HOVR Phantom review is on…

The HOVR Phantom uses a strange pattern for a runner. Most running sneakers go with flat rubber, mostly black, that wears really well and grips in most conditions, wet or dry. This colorway stayed with black, but the flat, normal traits are long gone. This shoe sports more of a turf, nub-like sole, and it wears well under use. After two months of wearing in the gym, on the treadmill, and on the road, the outsole looks nearly brand new.

Because of the nubs, there was some slipping on wet surfaces. On wet ground, like a cross country run or off-road, the outsole worked great. On smooth, hard surfaces, the outsole had some issues (wearing casual, walking into a store while raining, it was really noticeable).

The forefoot is segmented with lines cut completely across the pattern — letting the midsole flex with no resistance — which lead to a seriously good transition. With thicker midsoles stiffness in the forefoot can be a concern, but the HOVR Phantom rolls naturally and smoothly into your next step. Speaking of the midsole…

Here is where the magic happens: HOVR. Described by Under Armour as “a proprietary foam compound in partnership with leading innovators Dow Chemical, providing a super-soft durometer with incredible cushioning and shock absorption with every single foot strike,” HOVR is at once soft and responsive.

The beauty of HOVR is the ability to tune the stiffness. The white areas are EVA, used as a carrier foam for the HOVR inside. The Nike Lebron 15 HWC is the black areas in the cutouts and the heel. The red textile netting, the UA Energy Web, is where the tuning comes in.

Think of squeezing Play-Doh — if you keep squeezing it will go everywhere and lose its shape. However, if it is in a confined space it will reach a point of resistance and rebound. By tightening or loosening the netting the foam has increased or decreased rebound.

The HOVR Phantom is the softer of the two shoes (the HOVR Sonic is definitely the faster, stiffer ride) so for recovery runs or runners who require plush cushion, the HOVR Phantom is the shoe. From the very first try on it is soft underfoot and extremely comfortable. During runs, the midsole has a sinking feeling but responds underfoot with a soft bounce.

There is another element to the UA Curry 4 that contributes to all of this cushioning and comfort, and that is the SpeedForm 2.0 construction inside the shoe. SpeedForm, if you didn’t know, is a process Under Armour uses to mold the insole, shoe lining, and upper into one form-fitting piece with the midsole. That means there is no insole to speak of, your foot just sits right on the cushioning. SpeedForm 2.0 takes this construction a step further by adding cushioning zones in the footbed, some as thick as 12mm. This alone makes the cushioning a must-try.

We have already covered the midsole and outsole, so let’s look at the upper. A 5/8 height collar made of knit stretch materials makes entry into the shoe easy but still pops back into shape for a secure fit around the leg.

Going down into the midfoot, Under Armour used a chamois material for the side panels and heel. If you don’t know what chamois is, ask a long-distance cyclist. If you don’t know one, here goes: chamois is what’s used for cycle shorts with inner thigh/butt padding — it’s like a memory foam that is also moisture-wicking. It perfectly forms and fits around the midfoot, and while it may give the shoe a bit of a chunky look, on-foot the HOVR Phantom feels sleek and fast because of the fit.

The forefoot, tongue area, and collar are all circular knit, a process that provides stretch and comfort. The toebox is extremely stretchy and the collar, which shouldn’t rub with no-show socks, feels great, even when barefoot (I wanted to try the Speedform 2.0 directly under my feet). UA isn’t calling the knit Threadborne, but it functions the same while being just a bit thicker.

This may be a debated category. If you like your shoes to fit 1:1 with little to no wiggle room, go true to size with your normal Under Armour fit. If you like a little room for expanding and toe splay, go up half. I tried a TTS 10.5 and a half up to an 11 and for me the half up 11 worked better. Again, if you like the shoe to fit directly on your foot with no extra room, true to size should work, and the comfort isn’t sacrificed because the knit is stretchy and feels great against your foot.

The lacing system works perfectly to pull the midsole saddle up around the foot. An extra lace loop at the collar helps eliminate any heel slip you might get and also pulls your foot into the heel cup. Be careful on your lacing though: there was some lace pressure across the top of the foot when I laced in the rear loop — it went away when the shoe was loosened slightly and loosening did not affect the fit. Bottom line, don’t pull too tight.

One note: I did have some heel/Achilles chafing on my right foot after a couple of miles, but only my right foot. When I went up a half size it went away. Could be the shoe, could be the sizing — I’m just informing you all.

The main support component in the HOVR Phantom is the midsole, as crazy as that sounds. The foam carrier is stiff and thick enough that a shank plate/midfoot support structure isn’t needed. It is simply really difficult to bend this shoe from toe to heel. The foam also sits wider than the upper which acts almost like an outrigger on a basketball shoes. Even though the midsole sits a little higher than some, it never felt unstable.

Sometimes, with foam as responsive and bouncy as HOVR, it can feel a little out of control when active. From a vertical standpoint (foot goes up, foot comes down), the HOVR Phantom is extremely bouncy. Laterally, this would lead to instability. The white foam is stiffer and only allowed a certain amount of bounce before controlling. This leads to stable platform that is primary in support.

The other support structure is the heel cup, which is made of a soft TPU. It’s really nothing more than decoration, as it can be bent and moved with ease, but it does provide a little mental edge to think it helps with lateral movement. Plus, it breaks the upper pattern and gives UA somewhere for the logo placement.

This is what we have been waiting for from Under Armour. Charged in the running line worked and worked well, but it wasn’t groundbreaking. The looks, feel, and name (HOVR just sounds plush) are all an awakening for a brand that has been in need of a signature responsive foam since it moved away from Micro G (for some reason).

The HOVR Phantom is a comfortable and easy ride for recovery runs or runners who need a soft cushioning for their joints. If you have been looking for a runner that is both responsive and cushioned, the HOVR Phantom has you covered.

I won’t say HOVR will change the industry — who knows what the general public will latch onto next — but I will say it is the best cushioning Under Armour has ever put out, and it can be tuned for different activities and needs per shoe (more on that in the next review). If you are a serious athlete, you owe it to yourself to at least try a HOVR shoe on. The HOVR Phantom could be a menace that no one saw coming.  


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